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commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
, one bob dole. second lieutenant bob dole of kansas. and there began a friendship that lasted to this day. both gravely wounded, both dedicated more than ever to serve their country. both served with distinction. and the friendship, the bonds of friendship that were forged in that hospital between bob dole and dan inouye were unique and enduring. so dan inouye returned back to his beloved hawaii, and the story goes -- and i don't know if it's true or not. the story goes that dan inouye went down to join the veterans organization, and when he applied for membership he was told that the only members they took in that organization were caucasian. dan inouye decided that he wanted to continue to serve his country in the state of hawaii. he was the first united states senator from the state of hawaii and served longer than any senator in this institution. he was loved by all of us. i didn't always agree with dan. occasionally we had differences about how we use appropriations bills. but no one -- no one -- ever, ever accused dan inouye of partisanship or unfairness. he loved native
and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye of course was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling a story that's when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he rode senator dole aide notes that said, i am here. where are you? because both of them when they were recovering from their war wounds had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress and inouye got here first. a few years ago, senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens, of course another world war ii veteran, had flown the first cargo plane into what was then the king in 1944 and of course senator inouye was well regarded in china for that service. so the group of senators, there must have been a dozen of us from both parties, got more time with mr. hu and mr. wu the one and two leaders of china than almost the present of the uni
captures the human spirit. >> journalist and author bob woodward had an interview with blood it goes white house correspondent, mike allen. mr. woodward's latest book is the price of politics about a 2011 deathdealing negotiations in washington. mike allen also interviews marco rubio. they discuss the budget and taxes in the future of the republican party. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to playbook breakfast. thank you for coming out so early. we are excited to have an amazing doubleheader today. we are going to talk to senator rubio last night gave one of the first formal speeches to the head to the future of the republican party. we'll talk to senator rubio about that. next we have bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be in just a second. first, welcome to people in lifestream land. will be taking your questions on hash tag political practice. welcome c-span, welcome others who are watching. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership t
in michigan, one of the fellows i met there was bob dole, and we became good friends, even to this day. and when i asked him, what are your plans, and he, without hesitating said, i'm going to be a county clerk. after that, i'm going to run for the state house. of course, first opening in congress, that's where i'm going. i figure that's a good idea. so i went to law school. i became assistant prosecutor. when the territorial office became available, i ran for that office. and when stated came along, i got to congress. a little ahead of bob. >> you were in the territorial legislature then before you became -- >> two terms in the house and part of a term in senate spent and then came here as a member of the house. and who did you come here with at that time? >> the house had one member. >> you mentioned senator dole, and the fact that you had been in the hospital with him in michigan. it's amazing that some of these friendships were formed long before any public service, norma minetta talks about being a friend of, excuse me, the sender from wyoming, al simpson, and meeting him when he
as brief as you can. >> yes, bob rohr, british medical journal. most of the talk about has been the impact on the federal budget and balancing one pocket versus another. what analysis has been done, say, on these changes on the impact of the employability of seniors if an employer has to cover these additional costs for an extended period of time? my hypothesis is that it would make them less employable in some ways, either that or hasten the flight away from employer receiving and providing insurance. then on the consumer side, how would these increased costs affect access to care and probably quality of care? >> paul, do you want to start the first part of that? >> sure. on your first question, identify actually not heard anyone or any of the studies suggest that extending the medicare eligibility age would hasten the point in which employers might not offer coverage at all. what i with was trying to indicate earlier was that for the vast majority of employers outside of the industries where retiree health might be highly concentrated, the effect of the medicare eligibility age would be
the fiscal cliff. senator bob corker also spoke to reporters. >> good morning. i am lamar alexander. this is my colleague bob corker. merry christmas to you three points to make and then i would like to introduce cementer corker. here is the first point. when the dust settles and everything is said and done, federal individual income taxes are not going to go up on almost all americans next year. that needs to be settled this weekend by the votes and after the first of the year, so that's the most important point for americans to know. for almost all americans when the dust settles taxes, individual income taxes won't be going up next year. all the talk is about taxes but what we should talk about today is the medicare fiscal clef, the looming bankruptcy in the program that seniors depend upon to pay the medical bills for the millions of americans who are counting the days until they are eligible for medicare so they can afford the medicare bill, it would be a tragedy if when they get to that day there isn't enough money to pay the bills but according to the medicare trustees that d
efficiency. so we were able, bob teets before me begin that effort, achieved about $150 billion in savings. we've added about 60 to 70 billion on top of that in terms of further efficiencies. we'll continue to reveal for greater efficiencies can be achieved. right now i ask that question when i first became secretary. you know, what is the role of the service secretary vis-À-vis the service chief? the reality is there is an important role for them because they are civilians. civilians are involved in providing policy in their areas. they also have to negotiate a lot of the politics of capitol hill. so there's an important role for them to play in terms of a particular service. having said that, there are a lot of other places where we can achieve savings in the pentagon and we will. >> as the defense department does the downsizing services committee consider cuts to the number flag and general officers? >> again, i think that's part and parcel as he do force reduction. as i said, we are going to be reducing the force structure in the army to 490,000. the reduced the marines as well and i
-- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at the back. [applause] >> bob, thank you for your support for the uk youth parliament. now i'd like to ask to conclude the debate from scotland, mr. reardon fortune to wind up the debate. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. i would first like to extend my sympathies to the scottish parliament members who can't be with here today. so here i am. >> we just heard fromsome fantastic points for and against but a few stand out in my mind. this is right that someone of our age, doing the exact same amount of work and the exact same profession can legally be paid substantially less than someone in their 30s? it is unacceptable when it's aged toward young people. will minimum wage help young people or aggravate youth unemployment. as we all know, 16 and 17-year-olds receive minimum wage. 18 and 17-year-olds receive more and anyone over 21 receive more. are we to take from this the government believes the 18 and 17-year-olds to be less hard working or 16 and 17 years are less hard working. i should hope not. it's also cut
to identify yourself and keep your question as brief as you can. spent yes. bob, british medical journal. most of the talk has been about the impact upon the federal budget and balancing one pocket versus another. what analysis has been done on, say, on exchanges, on the impact of the employee ability of seniors if and employer has to carry these additional costs for an extended period of time? .. >> suggest that extending the medicare eligibility age would hasten the point at which employers might not offer coverage at all. what i was trying to indicate earlier is that for the vast majority of employers outside of industries where retiree health might be highly concentrated, the effect of the medicare eligibility age would be that at the margin there'll be some employees that would continue in the work force longer because the subsidies they receive from their employer for health insurance would exceed the subsidy that they would exceed if they got it on their own through the health insurance exchange. indeed, they might not qualify for one at all. but it could also be offet by individuals --
during world war ii, where he met phil hart and bob dole. and can you imagine those three great men coming together serving our country, wounded, doing rehabilitation at a hospital together in michigan and all going on to be involved in public service as united states senators. that building is still standing. it is no longer a hospital. it's another federal building. it's our great honor in michigan to have that building named the hart dole inouye federal center honoring all three of these outstanding leaders. senator inouye was a great mentor for me as well as so many of us in the senate. coming to the senate always encouraging me, during the elections always telling me to hang in there and theupbgdz would -- things would go well and it would be great. always the person with the smile on his face encouraging each and every one of us. he was there encouraging me when we were fighting for our economic lives in michigan with the automobile industry saying it was going to be okay, we'd be able to get through it and that things would be better on the other side. and he was right. with
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11